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Day 7 (Wednesday 5
th April)

     Handara Golf Course, Bedugul

Golf course Mees White-eye Mountain White-eye

Track behind golf course

Mees's White-eye

Mountain White-eye

The nowroutine 6.30 pickup from the hotel preceded a short drive to the local golf course, or, more accurately, a metalled track at its borders which was bounded on the North edge by slopes and both by forest. The hotel wasnít able to provide breakfast early enough, so this was a 2 hour saunter before returning, eating, and checking out. Plan for the site was to walk a couple of hundred metres along here while checking the trees on both sides. Yellow-throated Hanging Parrot is the speciality according to Hery, and this one of the best places to have a chance of seeing them perched, since most other records are for birds in flight. We had to wait a little for the stars of the show to put in an appearance, although a few Mountain White-eyes early on were more than an adequate interlude. A single Mountain Leaf Warbler was far too brief, although not that brief that the triple crown stripe was missed, and a Greater Racquet-tailed Drongo flew through. The Hanging Parrots were first picked up on their squeaky weak call, and then pinned down with some difficulty in the canopy tops directly above us. The problem was partly their size and colour, mimicking the leaves they fed around, and the strong backlight. Plodding on, we tried to locate a Crescent-chested Babbler, but despite the bird calling from within the thick cover only metres from us, it proved elusive. On the other hand, a White-bellied Sea Eagle soaring over was difficult to miss. Before departing for sustenance, we also logged a pair of Scarlet Minivets, Flame-fronted Barbet, and small numbers of Meesís White-eyes.

     Bedugul Botanical Gardens

After breakfast, we returned to the Botanical Garden in Bedugul, but visited a different part of the site. We spent the rest of the morning in one of the small cuts into the forested hill that had suffered from the effects of the landslide a couple of months ago. The evidence was stark, from crossing a makeshift bridge over a gouged out water course which still held the remnants of the broken concrete bridge, to the excavators parked to remove the excess mud which still lined the ground. At the end of this very small cut, steps led to some Hindu buildings, which were in full use today thanks to the Bali ceremony of Galungan, resulting in a constant stream of worshippers passing by to get to the temple and forest above to pay their respects. The main quarry here is an errant Javan Hawk Eagle, the only known location on the island for this vagrant, and Banded Fruit Dove. The latter flew over only once, not giving enough up for proper identification. We almost got excited about the former, with 2 large birds of prey over the slopes. The first was against bad light, and may have been a Crested Serpent Eagle. The second was soaring away from us, so all we saw was the dark of the back. Perhaps of most esoteric interest were the few Cuckoo Doves seen close to throughout our visit. They were initially called as Ruddy, and all but the first one undoubtedly were. This beast threw the spanner in the works. It had supposedly responded to a tape of Ruddy Cuckoo Dove, but the cinnamon breast and distinct rufous crown demarcated from plainer mantle were more indicators of Little. Another difficult bird was a singing Javan Whistling Thrush. It responded to a tape of its call, but refused to offer more than a couple of brief flight views inside the forest.

Temple Little Cuckoo Dove Ruddy Cuckoo Dove

Temple in Botanical Gardens

Little Cuckoo Dove

Ruddy Cuckoo Dove

     Butukaru Temple

A drive of 2hours or so found the temple at Butukaru. We couldnít have picked a worse day for this! The same festival of Galungan affected here even more, since today was the specific day of the 3 day event when temples were visited, and this was one of the biggest. There was already a closed road in place diverting us away from the direct route up, and when we did arrive, the car park was heaving with people. We all took the precarious lift on a motor scooter up the pull of the hill, to be deposited at the temple site which was packed with worshippers. If that wasnít enough, we all had to don a traditional sarong as a sign of respect. Surely with all the people and the racket of music there was no chance of any birds? Wrong assumption! We walked the short distance to a small lake with an impressive decorative island in the centre, to discover a Stork-billed Kingfisher flying from one side to the other. This is an uncommon bird on Bali, so much so that it was lifer for Boning. A disappointment was the lack of White-crowned Forktail which apparently is usually easy to see and accustomed to people. However, after a singing Fulvous-chested Jungle Flycatcher, the first of three birds was found on the edge of the lake, only a stoneís throw away from the epicentre of the music. After a further two male Forktails were found on the other side of the lake, a Dark-backed Imperial Pigeon was perched in a distant bare tree, and a couple of Grey-cheeked Bulbuls were feeding in fruits. We spent some time before departing for Denpasar looking for Orange-bellied Flowerpeckers but only had fleeting glimpses.

Temple Temple Forktail

Temple entrance

Lake behind temple

White-crowned Forktail

Stork-billed Kingfisher Fulvous-chested Jungle Flycatcher Grey-cheeked Bulbul

Stork-billed Kingfisher

Fulvous-chested Jungle Flycatcher

Grey-cheeked Bulbul

Home

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Introduction

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Day 6

Day 7 Day 8

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