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Day 8 (Thursday 6
th April)

     Uluwatu Cliffs

First order of the last day was to drive half an hour or so to Uluwatu Temple, which covers quite a large area, some of which bounds some fairly high and vertical cliff faces. When we arrived, we were more or less the first visitors to arrive, which was refreshing early on, but over the time we were there more and more day-trippers poured in, with selfie-sticks aplenty (do any of them actually manage to get an image with the vestige of a scene peeking out from behind a grinning mush?). Hery had mentioned in passing that it would get hot and necessitate plenty of sun screen. This was no idle threat! Sweat dripped off us straight away and it was baking by the time we left which was still quite early morning. To compound this, we were required to wear a respectful sarong yet again, which was far from comfortable or cool. We made our way from the car park, past some impressive temple artefacts, and found ourselves at the boundary wall overlooking the cliffs and sea far below. It only took minutes to pin down our main quarry here – White-tailed Tropicbird. At least 2 birds kept appearing from around the cliff corner to fly out to sea and back again. Views were distant due to the height but still satisfying. Most of our sightings were during the first half hour. We did stay peering down for over two hours, but only added a couple of Javan Mynas, Striated Herons, and a Collared Kingfisher.

Cliffs Tropicbird

Cliiffs

White-tailed Tropicbird

     Nusa Dua Lagoon

So to this lagoon, and as with some other sites we visited, wasn’t quite what I was expecting (which was a natural lagoon with some vegetation cover). The fact was that they are man-made regularly shaped and worked large ponds, separated by dividing banks. There is some woodland along one edge, and sparse trees throughout the lagoons. When we were there, there was also a lot of noisy heavy work going on near to the reception. That being said, there is a handful of good birds here which can be seen fairly easily. Vying for the role of stars of the show are the busy and beautiful Cerulean Kingfishers. It was difficult to know exactly how many there were, since they seemed to be constantly flying to and fro, either chasing after each other or fishing. Scarlet-headed Flowerpeckers gave them a run for their money for top spot, and were equally as active in a fruiting tree. Good news was that there seemed to be more of the stunning males than females. A couple of Brown-throated Sunbirds were also with them. Around the water were a good mix of herons and cormorants. The latter were a mix of Black-crowned Night, Purple & Striated Herons, as well as Great Egret. The latter, Little Pied & Little Cormorants, used the taller bare trees as perches.

Lagoons Cerulean Kingfisher Great Egret

 

Cerulean Kingfisher

Great Egret

Little Cormorant Little Pied Cormorant Night Heron

Little Cormorant

Little Pied Cormorant

Black-crowned Night Heron

Scarlet-headed Flowerpecker Purple Heron Spotted Dove

Scarlet-headed Flowerpecker

Purple Heron

Spotted Dove

     Serangan Island

After a lunch out of the morning sun, we headed over the seemingly never ending bridges that formed a sort of marine bypass to the airport area, to cross a small bridge to this island. It consists of a lot of reclaimed land, and is particularly good for close Beach Stone Curlew. However, time was pressing in as we found the small savannah type of area where they apparently favour, which also overlooked an inlet that held a variety of waders and some terns. Despite assurances that this was an easy bird, they didn’t seem to have read the script. Hery and Boning put some effort into trying to find them, but no luck. We did add one or two decent birds during the search, including Blue-tailed Bee-eater, White-shouldered Triller, Long-tailed Shrike, and Sooty Bulbul. As the time for departure for the airport approached, we realised that Hery, Boning, and Marcus the driver had all separated, so we located Boning and quietly mentioned it might be time to collect up the group and go. He was just about to when he heard the call of the birds, and just in the nick of time, we gorged on a stunning quartet of Beach Stone Curlews. Couldn’t have been timed better and provided an ideal end to the trip.

Selangan Island Selangan Island Beach Stone Curlew

 

 

Beach Stone Curlew

Beach Stone Curlew

 

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