Home

Paintings gallery

Video clips

Images

DVD

Contact

Site map

Links

Content

Introduction

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

Species list

Text only


Day 6 (Wednesday, 23rd April)

Silanche enrtrance

Tower

Entrance to Rio Silanche

Watching from the tower

    Having covered both the highlands and foothills, the decision for the last full day at Bellavista was to travel the 2 hours or so West to the lowlands around Rio Silanche, which is a river bounding now rare primary forest. This was the first day when the birding started in heavy rain, making the first hour grim walking, but this cleared as the morning progressed to peak at around 90 degrees heat and high humidity.

Forest


Forest track
 

    The initial plan was to walk to the tower, only a short distance from the car park. This started very well with a perched Broad-billed Motmot, but the short time we spent on the tower was fairly unproductive. This was also the case during the trail walk in the rain, when Woodcreepers in the guise of Plain-brown, Wedge-billed & Streak-capped were the only recipients of our attention. Bird life started to increase when we again reached the reception (which in truth was the farmer's house in disguise), with one or two goodies in his small plantation - Slaty-capped Flycatcher and Black-cheeked Woodpecker amongst them.

    The return to the tower was when the interesting birding began, and also when the rain stopped and the temperature increased. On the short approach track, we picked up a small flock of tanagers and flycatchers, which was unfortunately at the top of one of the trees. Moving on once again to the tower proved fairly productive. This spot is renowned for the roving mixed flocks (mainly tanagers) which can be seen from eye level. We only picked up a few of the commoner tanagers, which did include some Blue-necked Tanagers, and a single Scarlet-browed Tanager perched in the distance. Apart from a Boat-billed Flycatcher which was perched nearby on arrival, the best birds were either overhead or in the distance. Swifts and hirundines were almost constantly in view, with Lesser Swallow-tailed Swift being picked out. At least 2 Black-shouldered Kites were hovering in the distance, and a pair of either Choco or Black-mandibled Toucans perched a little closer.

    The trails were then hit again, with a lot more success in the drier conditions than earlier. Woodcreeper variety was good on this walk, with Wedge-billed, Streak-headed, Spotted & Black-striped all pinned down. The best spot was at the stream crossing, where a pair of Dot-winged Antwrens and a Scale-crested Pygmy-Tyrant initiated a bird party. White-flanked Antwrens were included, as well as a few Slaty-capped Flycatchers, and the aforementioned woodcreepers. A softly scolding call was identified as female Western Slaty-Antshrike.

    Before leaving the reserve, we took a short stroll along the track to the palm oil plantation. The first avian interest was a collection of flowering trees which were buzzing with hummingbirds. Quite a good view was had of some which unfortunately couldn't be identified. However, a single Blue-chested Hummingbird was named after a short discussion. The palm oil plantation didn't hold a great deal to capture our attention, but wasn't totally sterile, yielding Social Flycatcher, Ecuadorian Thrush, and a few Variable Seedeaters. On leaving the reserve, we stopped to admire a pair of Masked Water-Tyrants.

Track

Social Flycatcher

Track through Rio Silanche

Social Flycatcher

Ecuadorian Thrush

Black Vulture

Ecuadorian Thrush

Black Vulture

Tyrant site

Masked Water-tyrant

Site for Masked Water-Tyrant

Masked Water-Tyrant

    A few kilometres further West is the Ranchos Suamox, which is a fruit plantation owned by a very friendly couple. Their property is large, and on it they grow a wide variety of fruits to sell locally, as well as offering them to guests as juices and salads. This is highly recommended - the fruit is delicious.

    The owner also took us on a loop around the grounds, since it is also a very good environment for birds. Blue Ground-Doves abound, with strangely regular Pale-legged Horneros. Overhead, Rough-winged Swallows were joined by the much darker and less numerous White-thighed Swallows. A particularly good spot was a line of trees backing some of the open orchard. Yellow-margined & Bran-coloured Flycatchers were both here, as was Cinammon Becard and an unidentified barbet. Back at the restaurant, we followed up a not to be missed fruit salad with Black-crowned Tityra and Long-billed Starthroat in the same tree, as well as White-whiskered & Stripe throated Hermit in the garden adjoining the restaurant.

Ranchos

Stream

Ranchos orchards

Stream through Ranchos

Hornero

Black-cheeked Woodpecker

Pale-legged Hornero

Black-cheeked Woodpecker

Home

Paintings gallery

Video clips

Images

DVD

Contact

Site map

Links

Content

Introduction

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

Species list

Text only