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Day 5 (Tuesday, 11th March)

 

Bobiri

Bobiri

After a warmish night's sleep in a hotel with nohot water, towels, or air conditioning, we were unpacked and ready for a 3 night stay, until our driver asked as we were to leave if we needed a hand with our cases 5 minutes later, the bags were on board and we made the short drive to the forest. The signs for here seem more interested in pointing out the butterfly sanctuary, but the birding is excellent. Our morning consisted of walking a couple of miles along a track used by timber lorries (only a few early on) which ran through medium dense forest, some more open patches, and plenty of forest edge clearings. As usual, this took a little patience, but birds were regular and of a very interesting mix.

After notching up Pale Flycatcher in the car parking area next to the office, Western Bronze-naped Pigeon was picked out high up before departing the scene. Then came an excellent trio of Cuckoos, although African Cuckoo was a fly through. African Emerald Cuckoos were vocal, but enjoyed keeping to the canopy a little too much. The first was a male escorting a pair of females, with another male contesting song across the clearing. A calling male Black Cuckoo was somewhat closer, deigning to select a perch above us. An early fly through African Goshawk was followed a little later by a circling bird, as well as an African Hobby plying the same manoeuvre. To wrap up the birds of prey, a pair of Cassin's Hawk Eagles were high over, with singles of Harrierhawk passing through. One spot half way along our walk provided a mini "bird wave", initiated by a male Chestnut Wattle-eye. The same tree also held a Blue Cuckooshrike, Yellow-browed Cameroptera, and buzzing around was an Olive Green Cameroptera. Green Hylias were regular, and could eventually be pinned down to undercover singing branches. A perched Blue-throated Roller was only metres above us in a clearing for some time, also providing a bit of a rest stop, but a Western Nicator took more work. They have a powerful song, but have the irritating habit of producing this from dense cover. However, this bird did eventually fly out to a more obvious perch. Purple-throated Cuckooshrikes were high up but liked to be in the open, with at least 3 males vying for the girls. Quickest fly though was a Black-throated Coucal, which was seen very briefly but sufficiently for identification. We had been keeping our eye out for snakes through the trip, and a dead one on the track providing sustenance for butterflies was no compensation, but on the return a rustle of leaves from a bush very briefly picked part of what must have been one of the Mambas, judging by its arboreal preference and subsequent speed of leaving the scene.

Black Cuckoo Blue-throated Roller Crested Malimbe
Black Cuckoo Blue-throated Roller Crested Malimbe

Green Hylia

Western Nicator

Green Hylia

Western Nicator

 

Atiwa

Atiwa

After another 2-3 hour drive, where we seemed to beheading eastwards again towards Accra, we stopped off at a dirt track which seemed to initially be in fairly open land. Kalu couldn't hide his initial disappointment here, since trucks were regularly plying to and fro, leaving red clouds of dust in their wake. He summised that they were taking rockfill to the original gold mine, the selfsame reason for the track. This also reduced the quantity of birds by the roadside. However, we plodded on, adding more Common Fiscals to the ones already counted on the wires before the village, although a Black-necked Weaver was much less obliging, hiding in palm fronds. A couple of Sunbirds were seen as Collared, but then a third was made out - Buff-throated Sunbird. Viellot's Black Weavers were in almost constant view. Before crossing the track to a smaller, less used one, we spotted a male Black-and-White Flycatcher at the top of some spindly stems. The new track was devoid of any traffic, and a little more closed in than the makeshift motorway. It was also good for Barbets, with Naked-faced & Hairy-breasted and Yellow-throated Tinkerbird all seen. The track only went on for 100 metres or so, when it ended at a barred gate, which could be rounded to a footpath through the forest. This was quite a birdy spot, with Fraser's Forest Flycatcher, Green Hylia, and Velvet-mantled Drongo in attendance. While standing beside the gate, a White-tailed Rufous Thrush zipped past close to us. Before arriving at tonight's hotel, we stopped off at a village where countless Straw-coloured Fruit Bats were roosting on bare trees, just before the evening sortie.

Common Fiscal Naked-faced Barbet White-eye
Common Fiscal Naked-faced Barbet African Yellow White-eye

Home

Paintings gallery

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Contact

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Content

Introduction

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

Species list

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