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North Sewage Pools. These are adjacent to the south end of the reservoirs. They are reeded pools surrounded by an open area (good for Spur-winged Plover), and are excellent for a wide variety of birds. Our selection included crakes, waders, grebes, and a variety of migrant passerines (one of which was a Basra Reed Warbler - boring but rare!).

Basra Reed Warbler

Bluethroat

Basra Reed Warbler

Bluethroat

Namaqua Dove

Spur-winged Plover

Namaqua Dove

Spur-winged Plover

North Reservoirs. These reservoirs are quite large and shallow, and despite looking quiet, closer inspection reveals very good numbers of waders around the edges and on the floating vegetation. The best way to find them is to continue north past the sewage farm. A right turn at cross-roads next to greenhouses leads to the reservoirs (check the open area on the left - we had a Grey Hypocolius among the Masked & Woodchat Shrikes). A sign saying "Military Area - No Admittance" is generally ignored by everybody. At the end of this track, just before the reservoirs, look for 3 Namaqua Doves which are regularly seen around the last of the greenhouses. The reservoirs themselves can be driven around - probably a good idea since the birds seemed quite nervous.

Greater Sandplover

Slender-billed Gull

Greater Sandplover

Slender-billed Gull

Sewage Works. Following the track north parallel to the canal on the left, the Jordanian border crossing is passed on the right. The track bends to the left here, and meets the Arava highway. Just before it does, a smaller track runs parallel to it. This runs past what were open fields, but are now enclosed vineyards. After these, the raised and fenced in sewage works are found. Despite the fence, birders generally cut through a gap in the north-west corner. Good numbers of Pipits and Wagtails (including some Citrine) were around the edges of the pools. A small bush-filled depression between the works and the vineyards held a flock of Dead Sea Sparrows.

Woodchat Shrike

Woodchat Shrike

This is a popular tourist area, and is a wonderful geological site in itself. The valley runs for a few kilometres, and is reputed to hold breeding Sooty Falcons. It is well signposted just before the K40 road marker (follow the Timna Lake sign). There is an entrance fee of around  5 each, although we played dumb and flashed our bins, and got in for free. The best birding site was at the end of the road, where a small man-made lake attracted such birds as Sand Partridge, Desert Lark, and Squacco Heron. The bushes at the end of the valley are also worth a look (Little Green Bee-eater, Palestine Sunbird, and Rock Martin).

Desert Lark

Desert Lark

This is the best place to see a selection of desert residing larks, but patience is usually needed, and an early turn out almost essential. Both Hoopoe & Bar-tailed Desert Larks sing first thing, and both become difficult to find after mid-morning (which in reality is around 8 o'clock). The area is found by turning off the Arava highway at K33 (a radio mast is about 50m to the east). Park near the pumping station at the cross-roads. The best area for Larks was about 400m to the south of here, with most birds being on the west of the track between the 2nd and 3rd small square cages. A female Hooded Wheatear and Isabelline Wheatear were also here. The area of bushes east of the pumping station is supposed to be good for Desert Warbler, although all those we talked to found none (there were other migrants present at varying times). We did find 5 Desert Warblers in the scrubby area 1km to the north of the cross-roads. They usually appeared when an Isabelline Wheatear landed on their bush.
 

Hooded Wheatear

Female Hooded Wheatear

Home

Paintings gallery

Video clips

Images

DVD

Contact

Site map

Links

Content

Introduction

Eilat

Wadi Shelomo

K20/K33

Nizzana

Yotvata

Species list

Text only