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Day 8

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Day 8 (Thursday, 9th May)

First stop on the last morning had to be back at the Krüper's site at Achladeri Plain. When we arrived, we pulled the car up around 100m from the car park, at what we thought was the nest site. As soon as we opened the windows, Nuthatches could be heard calling, but although we sat for about 20 minutes, none came close to where we were. However, we did see Short-toed Treecreepers, including an adult being shadowed by a juvenile, and surprisingly heard our first Woodpigeons of the trip. When we left the car, we found one of the Krüper's quickly, although it was characteristically mobile, favouring the higher branches. It took a little time, but we eventually collected good views and photographs. As we arrived back at the car, it was perched on what was probably the nest bearing tree, although it seemed as if the young had fledged.

Krupers Nuthatch

Krüper's Nuthatch

This is reputed to be the most extensive reedbed on the island, and although not large by Blacktoft or Leighton Moss standards, it certainly covers some expanse. For the birds themselves, the reeds are superb, since they still contain ample water, and this is demonstrated by the amount of song from warblers throughout. From the observing aspect, the views of the whole beds are restricted, and the seasonal pools are definitely very seasonal by this time. Walking the tracks, including the one through the centre of the reeds to the old building, did find the pools, but there was very little water visible, so negating the chance of crakes. However, walking around did find plenty of warblers, with Reed most common and vocal, followed by Olivaceous, flighty Cetti's, and the odd Sedge & Moustached Warbler. In the distance was what sounded like one or two Savi's Warblers singing, although the song did seem to be in very short bursts (possible confusion with Mole Cricket?). The reedbed abuts the sea with a narrow sandy margin which held only a single Common Sandpiper. The sea was uncannily calm. After we had covered the reedbeds, we took a drive along both banks of the river upstream from the road bridge. This is not a bad track by Lesbian standards, and although good views of the river, which was by and large either dry or stagnant, are very restricted. The whole track proved productive for both singing Nightingales and Olivaceous Warblers. The former were possibly in numbers between 20-30, with individuals regularly being seen out in the open. Also here, another Middle Spotted Woodpecker, flushed from the middle of the track.

Olivaceous Warbler

Olivaceous Warbler

The remaining time on the island, passing the time before having to check in at the airport, was spent at Haramida marsh. This is only a 10 minute drive, and not a bad little spot. Singing Olivaceous & Cetti's Warblers were evident, with singles of White-winged Black Tern and Little Bittern over the reeds. A pair of Short-toed Eagles were over the ridge, and a few Alpine Swifts amongst the Common Swifts.

Home

Paintings gallery

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Introduction

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

Day 8

Species list

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