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Day 7 (Monday, 2nd March)

     From Myemai Lodge to Kibale

Picnic stop

 

During the drive to Kibale westopped off at a small lake in the hills for our picnic lunch. There was a small area with tables and even half decent toilets, and the added bonus of a group of Red Colobus in the trees overhead. In the canopy a short way over, there was also a group of Black and White Colobus. Lunch was preceded by African Dusky Flycatcher and a pair of Cinnamon-breasted Bee-eaters. When we had finished, we made our way down the short track to water level. It didn't take long to pick out a pair of Giant Kingfishers, and a pair of Black and White Casqued Hornbills flew overhead.

With an hour or so to kill before our early evening activity, a slow walk around the not too large grounds of the Kibale Guest Lodge grounds was quite productive. The best area was at the entrance gate, where a noisy colony of Viellot's Black Weavers masked the presence of a small group of Black-crowned Waxbills. A pair of Green-headed Sunbirds were in addition to a superb male Bronzy Sunbird. As usual, a pair of Blue Flycatchers were challenging, but seemed to have white in their tails for White-tailed.

Cinammon-breasted Bee-eater Dusky Flycatcher Giant Kingfisher
Cinammon-breasted Kingfisher African Dusky Flycatcher Giant Kingfisher
Black-capped Mannikin Green-headed Sunbird Green Pigeon
Black-crowned Waxbill Green-headed Sunbird African Green Pigeon
Lesser-striped Swallow Grey-headed Kingfisher White-tailed Blue Flycatcher
Lesser Striped Swallow (near Mweya Lodge) Grey-headed Kingfisher (near Mweya Lodge) White-tailed Blue Flycatcher
Viellot's Black Weaver Mantled Guereza Red Colobus
Viellot's Black Weaver Mantled Guereza Red Colobus

     Swamp walk

Swamp walk Swamp walk Swamp walk

4pm found us at the beginning ofthe swamp walk. This was to be a circuit of the swamp, which was around 5km,and take around 3 hours. We had donned long trousers and sleeves in case of biting bugs, although there didn't seem to be many about. The swamp was more of a wet woodland in places,  although there were some boardwalks over wetter and occasionally muddy parts in places. Outside of these, the swamp was dense and not easy to penetrate, although this was never the aim. The main claim to fame here is the variety of primates. They generally had to be carefully searched for, but all 4 of the species we saw - Red & Black and White Colobus, Red-tailed Monkey and Grey-cheeked Managabey - showed particularly well. The swamp is also known for its birds. We started well with Bronzy & Olive-bellied Sunbird, and Pygmy Kingfisher in bushes just below the reception. First big birds were a trio of Great Blue Turacos, obliviously feeding at the top of a palm tree. Then came a small bird party including White-chinned Prinia, Buff-spotted Woodpecker, and Blue Malkoha. After successfully luring out a Snowy-crowned Robin-chat, another bird party contained Purple-headed Starlings, Red-headed Malimbe, and Western Nicator, and the extra mammal in the form of Buhoma Squirrel. By the end of the walk, we were very hot and sweaty,  but the offerings of both mammals and birds made this worthwhile.

Black-and-white Casqued Hornbill Black-and-white Mannikin Great Blue Turaco
Black-and-white Casqued Hornbill Black-and-white Mannikin Great Blue Turaco
Purple-headed Starling Tawny-flanked Prinia Western Nicator
Purple-headed Starling Tawny-flanked Prinia Western Nicator
White-chinned Prinia Woodland Kingfisher Boehm's Squirrel
White-chinned Prinia Woodland Kingfisher Boehm's Squirrel
Grey-cheeked Mangabey Mantled Guereza
Grey-cheeked Mangabey Mantled Guereza
Red Colobus Red-tailed Monkey
Red Colobus Red-tailed Monkey

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Introduction

Day 1

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Day 5

Day 6

Day 7 Day 8 Day 9

Species list

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